Separation Agreements – What is Required?

The family law system in Ontario encourages litigants to settle their matter together instead of resorting to a judicial determination. The theory is that if the parties enter into an agreement about how to move forward as a separated couple they are more likely to be satisfied, and thereby adhere to, the terms of the settlement. Though formal separation agreements are not required to separate, they provide the peace of mind often required by parties to move on with the confidence of their financial and childcare position.

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4 mins read

Reasons to Keep Money Separate From Your Spouse

Some research suggests that money is a primary factor in more than half the divorces in Canada. Therefore, it is important that you carefully consider how you and your spouse will handle your financial matters.

When it comes to marriage finances, there are different schools of thought on how accounts should be held. Some believe that husbands and wives should pool all their finances while others think they should maintain separate accounts. If you are contemplating how to handle finances in your marriage,

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7 mins read

The difference between a marriage and a common-law union

A marriage is a formal and legally recognized union of two people who are in an intimate relationship. This union establishes the rights and obligations between the individuals. On the other hand, a common-law relationship is one in which two people live together in a conjugal relationship for a period of time without formalizing the union.

In Canada, common-law relationships legally fall under provincial jurisdiction. That is why the definition of a common-law relationship differs from province to province.

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7 mins read

Common Misconceptions: Principle Differences Between Common-law Relationships and Marriage

Rights arising under a common law relationship differ significantly from those afforded to married spouses.

In a common law relationship, one becomes a spouse after three years of continuous cohabitation or upon becoming the natural or adopted parents of a child, in a relationship of some permanence. For married couples, one automatically becomes a spouse after marriage, regardless of the duration of the relationship. A married spouse could be entitled to spousal support after one year of marriage;

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3 mins read

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